There hardly is a day that goes by when people don’t ask “How often should i tune my piano?”  To understand this question, there are a few variables you need to be aware of.  Firstly, there are roughly 18 tonnes of string tension pulling on most pianos at any given time.  To say to me “We hardly ever play it” in some ways is irrelevant because the strings are still under tension regardless of whether your hand touches the keys.  That said, pianos that get play a LOT will go out slightly if the tuning pins have not been properly set when tuning and i have noticed that more frequently used teaching pianos require more attention.  Second, humidity change plays a large part in tuning stability.  The strings are not just stretched from one end to the other.  They go over a bridge (much like you would see on a guitar).  That bridge is attached to the soundboard and depending on seasonal changes in humidity, the piano will fluctuate in pitch as the wood expands and contracts.

Now then, once you understand all of that, my usual response when asked how often pianos should be tuned is this: Depends how particular you are in having it in tune.  Recording studios and concert halls have it tuned every time it’s used.  Some churches even locally have it tuned once a month to quarterly depending on budget.  Most teaching studios tune twice a year.  Most families tunes yearly.

“But my piano doesn’t go out of tune that often”… hahaaaa.  I’ve encountered VERY few pianos in my lifetime and i’ve played over a thousand that rarely go out of tune.  My guess is that the piano is just gently creeping out of tune in such small increments that you don’t realise it’s gone out a few degrees.  My rule of thumb is that most people can’t hear when a piano is out of tune up to 6 degrees!  A degree in tuning is called a cent.  A semi-tone is 50 cents.  Full tone 100.  When pianos are out by about 3 or 4 degrees, the piano has still dropped in pitch but may not have been noticed.  Well… wait another year and then it’s out another 3 or 4.  Sooner than you know it, the piano has sunken 12-15 degrees over 3 or 4 years and instead of simply correcting a few degrees, you’re pulling strings.  My advice? Whether you hear it or not, do yourself a favor and keep it in regular maintenance.  And besides, like freshly squeezed orange juice, nothing beats a freshly tuned piano.